Transgender Thailand

Beyond Caitlyn Jenner: The Reality for Most Transgender People

By Anna Dirksen, PSI Consultant America was buzzing this week with talk about the 22-page Vanity Fair spread on Caitlyn Jenner that dropped onto newsstands June 9th. Caitlyn, who first became famous winning the gold medal in the men’s decathlon event at the 1976 Summer Olympics, talks openly in the article about how difficult it was for her to come

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Supporting Sexual Assault Survivors in Zimbabwe

By Kumbirai Chatora, Director of Social Marketing, PSI Zimbabwe April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month to raise awareness about sexual violence and engage communities on how to prevent it. According to the WHO, an average of 30% of women globally who have been in a relationship report having experienced some form of physical or sexual

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140 Characters of Gender-Based Violence

By: Jenny Tolep, External Relations and Communications This year’s March Madness has fired up more than just crazed basketball fans. It has also propelled a fight against gender-based violence. During the recent Kentucky vs. Arkansas basketball game, Kentucky Wildcats super-fan and PSI Global Ambassador Ashley Judd shared a comment on Twitter stating Arkansas was, “playing

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The economic case for contraceptive choice

By Karl Hofmann, president & CEO, PSI The headlines from India last November seemed anachronistic: “Web of Incentives in Fatal Indian Sterilizations” and “Deaths Put Spotlight on Indian Sterilization Camps”. The days of forced sterilisation must be behind us, aren’t they? Isn’t demographic pressure taking care of itself in the 21st century, through economic growth

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The future of philanthropy

Are we disenchanted with women’s empowerment?

By Kate Roberts A few weeks ago, I was sitting in a room full of women philanthropists at the Women Moving Millions Summit in New York where the theme was ‘power’ and how it can be used to transform the lives of girls and women worldwide. Suddenly the cast of a new musical comedy Disenchanted! appeared on

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Contraception changes everything

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Access to contraception is something we often take for granted in the United States. But 222 million women in the developing world – who have an unmet need for contraception – still can’t get it. How can contraception radically change their worlds?

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Why do we need an International Women's Day?

The Guardian gathered four gender-equality campaigners to share their views on feminism and the backlash against women’s rights. Here are some highlights.

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Geeta's story

 

Dharavi, Mumbai (India).

Ed note. Indrani Goradia, Founder of Indrani’s Light Foundation, just concluded a trip to India to visit PSI-India’s pilot projects to combat gender-based violence. These are her reflections.   

Today I spent time with prostituted women at Shakti Vahini, India’s leading organization to combat human trafficking and slavery.

It broke me. I felt sorrow, anger, rage, and incredible grief.

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Hillary Clinton launches global data project on women and girls

Yesterday at an event on the campus of New York University, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Melinda French Gates, joined by moderator Chelsea Clinton, announced a new global data project on women and girls

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The 50-year journey to India

A day fighting against gender-based violence, with Indrani Goradia

The Indranis Light Foundation and PSI are launching a pilot project with in India to explore solutions to reduce the prevalence of gender-based violence and provide survivors with appropriate services.

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The Top 10 Global Health Moments in 2013

By Karl Hofmann, President & CEO, PSI

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The end of each year provides the opportunity to reflect on what transpired and what was accomplished. Global health saw plenty of victories and setbacks in 2013. Drug resistant TB, slowing donor funding, new outbreaks of polio and a devastating typhoon showed how easily progress can stall.

Amid these challenges emerged a changing global health landscape. The old way of doing things is now, more than ever, on its way out. In the next five years, the range of actors that are engaging and making a difference in addressing global health issues will continue to broaden and expand, even as the underlying health challenges narrow, and as The Lancet recently described, converge.

The infrastructure that developed over the last 50 years to tackle global development – the United Nations, donor agencies, international NGOs, other intermediaries and host governments – now finds itself working more and more with corporations, impact investors, next generation philanthropists, and socially networked individuals. This burgeoning ecosystem of development actors generates unprecedented attention and potential resources to address global poverty. Getting the roles right for these and other players might have a lot to do with whether we can end extreme poverty during our lifetime.

These are our top 10 moments for global health in 2013. Top 10 lists inevitably leave lots out. What did our global health and development leaders miss? Let us know what you think and share a few of your predictions for 2014.

1. Typhoon Haiyan

We include Haiyan not only for the unimaginable devastation it caused but as a reminder that when the media attention wanes and the world moves on, the health needs of the people affected will still be great.

“We will continue to serve these communities’ immediate needs, as well as long-term needs including child and maternal health; nutrition; water, sanitation and hygiene; and mental health services.” – Nancy A. Aossey, President & CEO of International Medical Corps

2. Malala Yousafzai’s Ripple Effect on Family Planning

The impact of Malala Yousafzai’s efforts on education is obvious, less so is the impact she will have on the reproductive health of girls and women. If Malala has her way, girls will not only be better educated, they will have healthier families, build stronger communities and contribute to more robust economies.

3. Polio Movement Celebrates Successes, Faces Setbacks

The world is watching how the polio community will overcome conflict and violence to eradicate polio by 2018.

4. Global Leaders Show Unprecedented Support for Maternal and Child Health

In September, The World Bank, UNICEF, USAID, Norway committed $1.15 billion over the next three years to advance progress toward Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, and to get essential services and medicines to women and children who need them most.

5. Women Philanthropists Align for Health and Rights of Girls and Women

Women philanthropists are catalysts for new, innovative ways to deliver life-saving health products that will improve the lives of girls and women throughout the world. They are engaged and here to stay.

6. Gender-based Violence Movement Sees Tipping Point

World leaders acted on their commitments to eliminate gender-based violence, signaling a tipping point in the fight. Momentum is behind the movement. This is an issue to watch in 2014.

7. Under Mark Dybul’s Leadership, the Global Fund Is Back and Better than Ever

An impressive level of financial commitment from existing and new donor governments sends a strong signal.

8. Global USAID-Walmart Partnership Solidifies Long-Developing Trend

Public-private partnerships are not new. It is the magnitude of USAID’s partnership with Walmart that made us stand up and take notice.

9. Drug Resistance Threatens TB Progress, New Drugs Show Promise

By many measures the world is making great progress against TB – the rate of new cases has fallen worldwide and new drugs are in development – yet drug resistance seriously threatens that progress.

10. Women Deliver Conference Secures Bold Commitments for Girls and Women

More than 5,000 people gathered at Women Deliver in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to promote the health of girls and women, adding additional momentum to what economists, government donors, philanthropists conclude: when you invest in the health of girls and women, you lift.

Read the latest edition of PSI’s Impact Magazine here.

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Birth Control is Good for the Economy. Here’s How.

“For every $1 we invest in family planning, we save $4 in other areas like education, public health, and water and sanitation,” says the  Population Action International. A new inforgraphic from PAI shows just how much birth control can support the global economy (beyond its obvious benefits for women, girls, children and family).

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